City Council President Calls for Community Choice Energy

On January 24, City Council President Michelle Wu and Councilor Matt O’Malley introduced an order for a hearing on Community Choice Energy, which would make renewable electricity available to all Bostonians. Here is Wu’s statement.

At today’s 12PM Boston City Council meeting, we’ll be taking up a hearing order that I’m filing in partnership with Councilor Matt O’Malley on Community Choice Energy. Also called “community choice aggregation” or “municipal aggregation,” this refers to a state law that gives MA cities and towns the ability to determine our own energy future. The law lays out a process for the City of Boston to choose to power our city as a whole with renewable energy resources such as solar and wind. Community choice energy is the fastest way that Boston can get on the path to being a 100% renewable energy city. Read more about the process here: http://www.massclimateaction.org/community_aggregation.

Just last week, we saw the swearing in of a new President who denies climate change and plans to install climate change deniers to lead our federal environmental agencies. Yesterday, he issued executive orders attempting to move forward with the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines, which threaten water supplies, indigenous communities, and our environment. 2017 also could very well turn out to be the FOURTH consecutive year with record high average global temperatures (https://www.nytimes.com/…/earth-highest-temperature-record.…). It will take swift and bold action on the local level, trying our hardest to prevent global temperatures from reaching a catastrophic tipping point. Cities across the Commonwealth, nation, and globe have been leading by getting on the path to 100% renewable energy. It is time for Boston to get on board. Please follow our progress and JOIN US as the Council works on this legislation. Attend our future hearings to testify, or watch online and email in testimony. Give feedback directly to your City Councilors. Attend future working group meetings. As we’ve seen in recent weeks, changing the energy market won’t happen with a top-down approach; it will only happen with your support and action.

Fighting climate change and protecting our environment is about equity and social justice, standing together to prevent disastrous impacts that will fall disproportionately on vulnerable communities. There are many other opportunities in Boston and Massachusetts to get involved! Just a few that I’ve encountered (feel free to suggest others in the comments section and I’ll update):
–Join your local chapter of 350 Mass. Here is the link: http://350mass.betterfutureproject.org. Their advocacy training for this Saturday is full, but sign up and express your interest for a future training.
–Follow these pages on Facebook & show up to their meetings: West Roxbury Saves Energy Mothers Out Front – Mobilizing for a Livable Climate, Roslindale Affinity Group, Boston Climate Action Network, Stop the West Roxbury Lateral Pipeline, Mass Sierra Club, Clean Water Action Massachusetts, Boston Node of 350 Mass, Mass Power Forward, Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM), Mass Energy Consumers Alliance.
–Buy 100% New England Wind to power your home. Learn how this works: https://www.massenergy.org/renewable-energy/whatistheswitch. My family switched over to this in 2016.
–Support Boston’s proposed plastic bag reduction ordinance (http://meetingrecords.cityofboston.gov/sirepub/view.aspx…) by reaching out to your Councilors and asking them to vote yes. Until then, use fewer bags. Even one fewer bag in landfills or littering the streets of Boston makes a difference.
–Tell your local elected officials that you support more investment in lower emissions transportation infrastructure, such as bicycles, buses, and trains. Come to our City Council transportation briefings, Feb 2nd on Transit Signal Priority and March 2nd on Parking Management.
–If you are purchasing a new car, consider your Drive Green options. Some helpful research: https://www.massenergy.org/drivegreen
–There are lots of rivers in greater Boston – the Charles, the Neponset, the Mystic. Join your local riverwatershed non-profit mailing lists and join annual river cleanups, fundraising events, etc. Charles River Watershed Association The Charles River Conservancy Mystic River Watershed Association Neponset River Watershed Association
–Look for ways to support efforts against the Keystone XL and Dakota Access Pipeline. Groups will be organizing drives for supplies to be sent to protestors who will camp
–Stand with local college student groups demanding that colleges divest their endowments away from fossil fuels.

 

Getting Boston ready for climate change

Climate change is here. Summers are getting hotter, sea levels are rising, storms are getting stronger and wetter, and there’s more flooding.

The City has been studying those changes with researchers at UMass Boston and a public advisory group (including BostonCAN) for over a year. Their final report is out and it includes:

  • Detailed projections, including climate change’s “equity impacts” — how low-income communities, people of color, and other vulnerable populations will be affected.
  • A detailed look at the neighborhoods that’ll be hit hardest: Charlestown, the Charles River, Dorchester, Downtown, East Boston, Roxbury, South Boston, and the South End.
  • Steps we can take.

Greenovate Boston is asking us to spread this climate change consciousness to our neighbors. Find a blog, article, image, or video about Climate Ready Boston that you can share to keep your friends and family up to date on climate change in Boston.

Push back on Trump’s Climate Deniers

standupforscience

San Francisco, December 13: scientists push back on Trump’s cabinet picks

Trump has appointed Big Oil representatives and climate deniers to lead four key agencies: the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Interior Department, and the State Department. Now national environmental groups are taking action. Here’s what they are doing and what you can do.

Rex Tillerson – Secretary of State

350.org: rallies, calls, ads, and a petition

  • Tuesday Dec 20: Rally at Trump transition headquarters in Washington, DC.
  • January 3, when the new Senate takes office: make thousands of phone calls to every Senator telling them to vote against the Denier Cabinet.
  • The following week: take to the streets in all 50 states to oppose their nominations.
  • Fill the digital airwaves with ads calling out Senators who say they agree with climate science, but still support Trump’s climate denying cabinet.
  • Sign this petition. [Unclear whom it’s going to]

Sierra Club: Petition urging our senators to oppose Tillerson’s nomination.

Why push back on this nominee: Tillerson, a lifelong employee and CEO of ExxonMobil, has shaped its history as one of world’s biggest, most environmentally destructive fossil fuel corporations.

ExxonMobil deliberately concealed its knowledge of climate change while funding denialist groups for decades in order to prevent climate action from hurting their profits. [See Exxon’s decades of deceit: A timeline of what Exxon knew about climate science, and what they’ve done to deny, hide, and muddy the truth]

It was responsible for the Exxon Valdez oil spill, one of the costliest environmental disasters in history, and countless other spills. Elsewhere around the world, Exxon has supported violence and intimidation against communities where it operates.

As Secretary of State, Tillerson would oversee everything from negotiating international climate agreements to issuing annual human rights reports and reviewing the Keystone XL pipeline.

Rick Perry – Department of Energy

Friends of the Earth: Petition urging our senators to block Perry’s nomination

Why push back on this nominee: As governor of Texas until 2015, Perry championed fossil fuel production. He wrote that climate science is a “contrived phony mess” and accused climate scientists of manipulating data to get money.

He fought the regulation of greenhouse gas emissions because of the “devastating implications” for the energy industry. He opposes truly clean energy like wind and solar.

Perry has received some $2.5 million from polluters. As head of the Energy Department, Perry would have power to roll back climate progress.

Ryan Zinke: Interior Department

Friends of the Earth: Petition urging our senators to block Zinke’s nomination

Why push back on this nominee: Ryan Zinke is a freshman Congressman from Montana. In just two years he’s received a whopping $345,000 from fossil fuel interests.

Zinke has said that climate change is “not a settled science.” He’s opposed the most basic protections for our public lands. He thinks our national forests should be handed to the logging industry with no protections for the environment, and he’s been a leader in opposing the Obama administration’s attempts to keep coal in the ground.

As head of the Department of the Interior, Zinke would have a lot of power to roll back our progress. He would not keep fossil fuels in the ground on our public lands and waters. Instead, he’d work for a massive expansion of fossil fuel development. That would amount to billions of dollars of giveaways for Big Oil.

Scott Pruitt – EPA Administrator

Sierra Club: Petition urging our senators to block Pruitt’s nomination.

Why push back on this nominee: Climate denier Pruitt has taken more than $300,000 from fossil fuel interests since 2002. As Oklahoma’s Attorney General, he sued the EPA — the agency he’s slated to lead.

All four nominees

Friends of the Earth: Organize a Day of Action at your local congressional office

Hosting an action outside your Member of Congress’s local office will push them to hold Trump accountable. It’ll also connect you with other progressives who want to do more.  After you sign up, the Sierra Club will send you an Action Toolkit, a letter to deliver to the Congressional office, and they’ll invite you to a series of training calls. They recommend holding your action on January 23, Trump’s first work day as President.

And…

Last month we urged BostonCAN members to resist Trump’s “cook the planet” agenda by taking three steps:

  • Call our senators and representatives, asking them to pull together a bipartisan force for climate progress.
  • Make that safe for their colleagues by writing letters to the editor in other states. Sample letters here.
  • Build national support by talking to your family and friends in red and purple states.

Boston City Council passes gas leak ordinance!

The Boston City Council passed our Gas Leak Ordinance on Wednesday December 14 by a vote of 12 to 1. (The holdout: Frank Baker.)

Thank you for supporting this multi-year, multi-organization campaign. Let’s celebrate — and call our city councilors to thank them. 617-635-3040 is the City Council number.

You can see a summary of the ordinance here. It will:

  • Speed up gas leak repairs.
  • Improve coordination between the City and National Grid.
  • Require National Grid to give the City more info about leaks and pipes.
  • Make sure leaks are repaired and pipes replaced correctly.
  • Increase safety for gas workers and the public.
  • Require contractors to follow the Boston Resident Jobs Policy.

 

Why ban plastic bags?

(Thanks to the ban the bag campaign for this writeup.)

WHY should you support a single use plastic bag ban in Boston?

  • 41 cities and towns across the state have adopted some form of banning plastic bags and Boston would be a tipping point for the state to adopt a statewide single use plastic bag ban

  • 95% percent of plastic bags are not recycled!

  • Plastic bags litter our communities, waters, and properties, just look around.

  • Many major cities in the US have also adopted ordinances and continue to thrive with a huge reduction in waste and decrease in money spent on dealing with the waste

Can I just stop here and say these should be reason enough? However there are tons more including…

  • The City of Boston deals with 20 tons of plastic bags per month that are disposed of improperly in Boston’s single stream recycling.

  • There are many ways to support low-income families with this ordinance, including bag drives.

  • Low-income areas are often hit the hardest with the plague of plastic bags littered everywhere.

  • Many farmer’s markets have stopped using plastic bags as the state moves to regulate a plastic bag ban at farmers markets and it has not stopped people from shopping at them; at farmers markets, you find community, amazing small businesses, and incredibly fresh produce.

  • Many plastic bags are used for minutes, but last 1000 years!

  • ExxonMobil was responsible for introducing the plastic shopping bag to the U.S., and the bag debuted in American grocery store checkout lines by the late 1970-80’s. That means that people were shopping at stores for centuries purchasing, buying, and trading without the plastic bag.

  • Healthier Habits; Boston aims to be zero waste  according to its Climate Action Plan.

  • There are Plastic Bag Bans in all over the world including entire countries, like Australia, Bangladesh, South Africa, Tanzania, Rwanda, Phillipines, Pakistan, Ireland, Mali, Ivory Coast, Italy, India, Haiti, China, and others and they do not inhibit purchasing local.

  • In 2007, SF was the first city to ban plastic bags in the US;  people and stores are still thriving.

READY TO HELP? WONDERFUL!

Below is a list of what to do. Right now people whose job it is to push back on the ordinance are pushing hard. Last week they started making lots of calls to the City Councilors saying not to support the ban. City Councilors-At-Large are voting and they NEED to hear from you.

TAKE A FEW MINUTES TO HELP: in order from most impactful to least

  1. Calling your City Councilor, the three Councilors-At-Large and significantly, the Mayor has the greatest impact

  2. Writing a letter to the above mentioned

  3. Emailing: we know this is the most convenient, but if you are to do anything, CALL! Write too, if you have it in you.

ALSO IMPACTFUL:

IF YOU ARE ABLE, PLEASE COME to the HEARING DEC 13th @1pm

They need to hear from us, as residents, business owners, and community members that policy matters; they can make a difference to the entire city with less waste.

Find your District City Councilor here:
http://www.cityofboston.gov/myneighborhood/

Mayor Walsh: 617.635.4500

Michael Flaherty (At-Large): 617-635-4205
Annissa Essaibi-George (At-Large): 617-635-4376
Ayanna Pressley (At-Large): 617-635-4217

Sal LaMattina (District 1): 617-635-3200
Bill Linehan (District 2): 617-635-3203
Frank Baker (District 3): 617-635-3455
Andrea Campbell (District 4): 617-635-3131
Tim McCarthy (District 5): 617-635-4210
Tito Jackson (District 7): 617-635-3510
Josh Zakim (District 8): 617-635-4225
Mark Ciommo (District 9): 617-635-3113

Councilors O’Malley and Wu’s public hearing regarding the reduction of plastic bags will take place on Tuesday, December 13th at 1 pm in the Iannella Chamber on the fifth floor of Boston City Hall.

The hearing is open to the public to attend and testify. Any written comments may be made part of the record and available to all Councilors by sending them by email, fax, or mail to arrive prior to the hearing.

 

Push back on Trump’s climate denier

Donald Trump’s transition team for the Environmental Protection Agency is headed by climate denier Myron Ebell. Funded by Marathon Petroleum and Koch Industries, Ebell could kill Obama’s Clean Power Plan, the Paris climate agreement, and all the land, water, and air protections the EPA provides.

But just before Thanksgiving, Trump announced that he might rethink his views on climate change and might not pull out of the Paris agreement. Our task now is to push him in that direction. Here’s how.

  • Write a letter to the editor of your local paper — or better, a paper in a purple or red state. Here are New Hampshire’s two biggest papers, the Concord Monitor and the Manchester Union Leader. Two sample letters are below — you can choose ideas you want to write your own.
  • Call your senators and congressperson. Ask them to speak with moderate Republicans and pull together a bipartisan call to Trump: no climate deniers — keep the EPA and climate work moving forward.
  • Call, text, tweet… your family and friends in purple and red states. Ask them to call their congresscritters, write local newspapers, and talk to their friends about saving the climate right now.

By doing these things we can head off the worst and build a mass constituency for climate action in the long term.

Okay, here are the letters. Please rewrite them with your own words and thoughts, and let us know what results you get!

Letter 1: conservative, pro-business appeal

To the editor:

Myron Ebell  is leading the Trump administration’s transition team for the Environmental Protection Agency. His organization’s mission statement is “dispelling the myths of global warming.”

This is bad policy for our economy and our standing in the world.

Climate change is real. It poses a significant and immediate threat to humans everywhere. This has become universal consensus. Russian and Chinese governments are among those who acknowledge climate change, and are committed to international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

At this point in history, to oppose the scientific consensus on climate change would be a source of national embarrassment. It would erode our standing as a technologically innovative nation, and limit our access to global markets that plan to regulate greenhouse gas emissions.

Ebell has also said that the US should back out of the Paris climate agreement. Besides violating international law, this would be catastrophic diplomatically. France has threatened export taxes, and statements from other nations have been equally severe; a rift is forming between us and the rest of the world.

Over 300 U.S. businesses have signed a statement calling on Trump to support the Paris agreement including General Mills, eBay, Intel, and other Fortune 500 companies. China, the heir apparent in the race to develop innovative renewable energy technology, has remained committed despite Ebell’s rhetoric.

Denying climate change is a bad deal for the US. We encourage readers to demand that the US remain committed to the Paris agreement and the global fight against climate change.

Letter 2: Anti-pollution, pro-environment appeal

To the editor:

Decades of environmental progress are being threatened by the Trump administration’s transition team. Myron Ebell, who’s responsible for the future of the Environmental Protection Agency, is funded by mega-polluters like Marathon Energy and the Koch Brothers, and he’s pushed to undo EPA regulations that protect our health every day.

The EPA does crucial work. The EPA enforces laws that keep the food, air and water we consume safe, protects endangered species, and funds scientific discoveries that support business and keep us healthy.

Over its 40+ year history, the EPA has made incredible advances for America. Not long ago, dumping toxic waste into waterways was standard practice. In just 10 years of regulating CFC chemicals, we have slowed the depletion of the ozone layer. When BP spilled 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, experts in science and technology were equipped with the resources needed to clean it up.

This is hard work. Because its mission often runs contrary to short-term business interests, the EPA is constantly subjected forces that seek to impede its ability to do that hard work.

When the EPA is unable to fulfill its mission, the result is injustice. We need only to ask the citizens of Flint, still struggling to find clean water, to know how dire the implications can be.

Myron Ebell, head of the EPA transition team, is not a scientist, and has included repeal of environmental and pollution regulations among his goals. He is an irresponsible steward of our planet, without the scientific expertise Americans expect of someone with his responsibilities.

Regardless of party, we have an obligation to leave this world better than we found it. Americans should demand that our nation remains the right side of history on important issues like climate change and environmental regulation.

e.